Pages

Because sometimes a status update just isn't enough.

Because sometimes a status update just isn't enough.

09 December 2011

A Step Back

*Author's note:  There will be no funny today.  I feel like there is a lot happening in my life that I need to mull over and think about.  I found out yesterday from my mom that my dad probably has as little as three weeks left.  There is a chance he won't be here for Christmas, and along with that, my birthday.  I'm having a hard time accepting that, even though I've been aware of the inevitability of his death for about 6 months now.  


I spent yesterday dwelling on everything in my life that is going wrong, which basically feels like everything in my life.  I feel like if I stepped outside, an anvil would fall on my head, or I'd step down a manhole without a cover, or a random piece of space equipment would plummet down to earth and crush me.  


Sometimes, I forget to be thankful.  


Sometimes, life kicks me in the ass and all I can think about is the giant boot print in my backside and suddenly, before I know it, I can't think of anything positive.


Sometimes I need someone to find peace and gratitude in the little things to make me realize how selfish I'm being.


My friend, Wendy, has a way of humbling me without intending to.  




Her beautiful son, Kegan, is a smart, funny, silly, sneaky, amazing little boy, who also happens to have severe autism.  Wendy handles every day with a strength and dignity that I admire and could only hope to achieve one day in my own life.  


She recently wrote this open letter to educators who work with children with special needs.

















A letter to educators,

This letter is meant to be a thank you to the teachers that teach our kids in a way that they learn compassion for everyone. 

Thank you to the teachers that remember their students 20 years later regardless if that child was a challenge or not.

Thank you for remembering the great things about my child and giggling with me about how much he has grown out of his challenging stage.

Thank you for never seeing my child’s disability as a problem for you and always figuring out a way to include them is your class.

Thank you for always keeping the kids as equals and never saying things like “if there are enough for my kids then how do you expect me to include your child?” instead you said “your child is one of my students and I think I learn as much from him as he learns from me.”

Thank you for never underestimating how the other kids in the class will accept my child into their group.

Thank you for remembering that it is not always about what my child learned from you, it is just as important what my child learns from the other kids in your class.

Thank you for remembering that in IEP meetings that we are talking about my child and it is not a business meeting to me.

Thank you for not sending my child home when he was having a rough day just because you didn’t want to deal with him.

Thank you because if I didn’t say thank you for all those reasons I would have been very worried to send my child into your class every day.

From A Mom






She also posted this amazing link on her wall... please take the time to watch and read the message.






To Wendy... thank you for trusting me with your beautiful child.


To Kegan... thank you for teaching me about you, autism, and for helping me become a better, more tolerant person.  You are forever in my heart.




Have an amazing weekend, everyone.